Repeaters

The South Canadian Amateur Radio Society (SCARS) operates a number of repeaters in central Oklahoma. This page documents each of these repeaters and should be used to get your radio connected to one or more of these devices. The technical committee maintains also a blog at http://scarsrepeater.blogspot.com/ that has some additional technical information.

VHF/APRS – 144.390 MHz – NORMAN Digipeater

This digipeater operates on the Amateur Packet Radio System (APRS) network. This APRS repeater can be found online at aprs.fi and search the callsign NORMAN. The digipeater is located at the Cleveland County District 2 facility at 72nd and Alameda, in Norman, OK. This uses the same antenna as the VHF repeater connected through a Telewave multi-coupler.

This machine is operational 24 x 7 and is behind an instant start generator that will provide power in an emergency situation.

VHF/FM – 146.880 MHz – W5OU

This FM repeater is located on the campus of Oklahoma University, at the top of the Physical Sciences building. This repeater uses the common -600 kHz offset but no CTCSS tone is required. This is a 1964 Motorola Motrac repeater that serves the Norman area. This machine uses an RC 850 controller with an analog delay line which gives this system a distinctive audio tone.

This system is on OU power, which is fed from two different generating sources. This redundant power source should keep this machine online during emergency conditions.

VHF/FM – 147.060 MHz – W5NOR

This repeater transmits on 147.060 MHz, has a +600-kHz offset, and requires a 141.3-Hz CTCSS tone. This repeater is available for general local use 24 hours a day. However, during severe weather conditions, or emergency situations, this repeater is the primary ARES communication repeater.

This repeater is located at the Cleveland County District 2 tower, east of Norman, at about 72nd and Alameda. This system uses an Andrew® DB224-E antenna, that provides about 6 dBd of gain. This antenna is on the west leg of the tower, about 300 feet above ground level. Ground level at this location is 1,187 feet above sea level.

This machine is operational 24 x 7 and is behind an instant start generator that will provide power in an emergency situation.

UHF/FM – 443.700 MHz – W5NOR

This repeater transmits on 443.700 MHz, has a +5 MHz offset, and requires a 141.3-Hz CTCSS tone. Co-located with the VHF repeater at 72nd and Alameda, this system uses an Andrews® DB408-B antenna, which provides about 8.7 dBi of gain. This antenna is on the west leg of the tower, directly below the VHF antenna, about 280 feet above ground level.

This machine is operational 24 x 7 and is behind an instant start generator that will provide power in an emergency situation.

UHF/DMR – 443.825 MHz – N5MS

This networked repeater operates from the OU Physical Sciences building. This is networked via the Brandmeister system and can be seen online at http://brandmeister.network. Detailed information on operating this format is available on the W5NOR OKDMR page.

UHF/D-STAR – 444.750 MHz – W5TC

This digital repeater uses the ICOM D-Star digital encoding and operates from the National Weather Center. This repeater is on 444.75 MHz and uses a +5 MHz offset. The gateway information can be seen online at https://w5tc.nwc.ou.edu/

UHF/FM – 444.625 MHz – W5LHG

This UHF repeater is west of Blanchard. This repeater transmits at 444.625 MHz, has a +5 MHz offset, and requires a 127.3-Hz CTCSS tone.  In addition to local traffic, this repeater is connected to the Internet via Echolink ID 212301. More information about this repeater can be found at QRZ.com. This repeater is operated by W5LHG.

UHF/D-STAR – 442.975 MHz – KF5ZLE

This UHF D-STAR repeater is west of Blanchard. This repeater will auto connect to the Oklahoma Reflector, REF052B. Users are welcome to connect to other reflectors or gateways. After 10 minutes of idle time, it will reconnect to REF052B. More information about this repeater can be found at QRZ.com. This repeater is operated by  W5LHG.

VHF/APRS – 144.390 MHz – W5LHG Digipeater

This digipeater operates on the APRS network. This APRS repeater can be found at aprs.fi.  This repeater is located west of Blanchard and provides an Internet gateway for the APRS system. More information about this repeater can be found at QRZ.com. This repeater is operated by W5LHG.

Report a Technical Problem

Please enter any technical system observations you may noticed. The technical maintenance team will review this information. The date/time will be recorded, if this report is for a previous date/time, please make a note of this in your comments. You have 1900 characters that you may enter.
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Reported System Issues

The following reports have been documented and reviewed. All times UTC, and observations reported above will be shown here once they have been reviewed.
DateSystemReporterDescriptionResolved Date
2020-03-30 21:48:09147.06-Analog-RepeaterK5HHQContinuous static with for at least 5 minutes from 4:40 PM CDT to 4:45 PM CDT on Monday, March 30, 2020. I checked a couple of other repeaters in the OKC area and there was no static. The static had not weak voice component.2020-04-01 00:00:00
Resolution: The log for that time frame runs from 4:18 to 4:48 pm. The audio file for that half-hour time is only 20 seconds long and contains 5 kerchunks. So, any signal that you received wouldn\'t have come from the .06 machine in Norman. You could have been hearing another .06 machine in the region, or you could be receiving some local interference at your location that may have popped your squelch open.
2020-03-18 00:24:47147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGAt 18:51 hrs local came an automated announcement from the W5NOR controller giving it's model number and other information. I asked on the air who was working on the controller but of course no one responded. I would like confirmation of this log entry. I have made several other entries and none of them are listed below and I would like to know why.2020-03-21 00:00:00
Resolution: I downloaded the log audio and can hear the announcement referenced. This audio is played by the controller upon powerup. For future reference, the text is RC Two Ten Repeater Controller v 7.61 Ready W5NOR Repeater Tone 141.3. This is signifying that it is an RC 210 controller, using version 7.61 of the software, and it is now ready for use. It then plays the callsign message to identify legally. Our callsign text includes the tone frequency of 141.3 to let users know the correct number. Yes, you called me, but I was still at work. If you recall, Tuesday evening had a lot of wind and weather. If you listen to the rest of the log audio we can hear discussions of weather affected a number of the hams. At the start of the recording eerie audio is heard that is consistent with a nearby lightning strike. This log receiver is 2.51 miles from the transmitter, so I would lay odds that something close was struck by lightning. Therefore, I would assume that the incoming AC power was interrupted, and was restored when the controller message played. The other entries you referenced were discussed at a previous meeting, but I will take the extra time to run through them again below. Audio from that time is linked here so people can hear successful restart audio. Over time the version number may slowly increase. https://w5nor.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/202003171922-18392-20949.mp3
2020-03-15 20:20:47147.06-Analog-RepeaterK5HHQAt 3:00 pm - 3:10 pm, 3/15/19, there was a lot of static on receiving. There were two stations talking and, based on their conservation, they were in Norman. The static went away when they quit transmitting. The audio was good but the noise level was very high from both transmitting radios. This is the first time I have hear such static on the repeater. I was running the same antenna and radio I always use.2020-03-21 00:00:00
Resolution: I assume that this should be a 2020 report, and that this isn\'t a year delayed report. After listening to the audio log report, I didn\'t hear any traffic on the Norman 147.06 repeater. My assumption is that you were receiving a signal from one of the other 147.060 repeaters in the region. I have included the log audio at the following link from the Norman log receiver. The antenna on the receiving log machine is low, so it usually doesn\'t hear the adjacent machines.https://w5nor.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/202003151540-920787-20949.mp3
2020-02-23 21:41:57147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLG02/23/2020 @ 15:20 the repeater lost the courtesy tone just before dropping he carrier. This can also be verified by WA6DKD 2020-04-12 00:00:00
Resolution: I pulled the audio log report and listened to that time period. This seems to match a previous issue. The controller manufacturer has advised that there is a programming option that must be turning off the courtesy tone.. This was adjusted in the 7.65 version, released 3/31/2020. It will be uploaded on the next site visit. I have included a copy of the audio below. https://w5nor.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/202002231545-876305-20949.mp3
2020-02-20 15:25:15147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLG02/20/2020 at 9:09 this morning the repeater keyed up and said: "200 Repeater version 1.14" un-keyed and the re-keyed and said "Ready". Nothing else was heard but it would appear that someone was trying to do something with the repeater.2020-03-21 00:00:00
Resolution: After listening to the log audio report, the correct restart message was played near this time. Please see the report on 3/18/2020 for the actual detailed script that plays. Reviewing the historical weather reports it appears that there was a 25 mph wind gust that took the average wind speed from 15 mph to 20 mph at that time. So, the assumption would be a power outage blipped the incoming AC power. For future reference, this system is on a generator backup emergency power system that activates 15 seconds after the incoming power is shut off. So, power will be off for 15 seconds before the generator power comes online. When the power returns, the generator syncs the generator power with the incoming power and switches back to the power mains during a zero crossing event. There\'s no indication when the power comes back online.
2019-09-26 13:57:26147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGThus far over the last 2 days 9/25-26/19 we have been having repeated data burst that proceed the W5NOR call sign or are independent of the call sign. The times are as follows: 09/25/19 @ 12:50 & 13:50. 9/26/19 @ 00:46, 07:46, 08:46. Has our repeater acquired the APRS capability? 73, Lea - W5HLG2019-10-05 00:00:00
Resolution: From listening to the log audio reports, these data bursts are packet radio transmissions that someone is sending over the repeater input frequency of 147.66 MHz. No repeater superhuman tricks here, but the repeater is dutifully repeating that signal and that is what is being heard. There is a popular Yeasu handheld radio that makes it easy to flip from the APRS frequency to the primary listening frequency. The assumption is that this has happened to someone locally.
2019-09-22 03:11:20147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGAt EXACTLY 22:00 hrs local time there was a data burst that was immediately followed by the W5NOR repeater identification. When you listen to it you will see exactly what I am talking about.2019-10-05 00:00:00
Resolution: From listening to the log audio reports, these data bursts are packet radio transmissions that someone is sending over the repeater input frequency of 147.66 MHz. No repeater superhuman tricks here, but the repeater is dutifully repeating that signal and that is what is being heard. There is a popular Yeasu handheld radio that makes it easy to flip from the APRS frequency to the primary listening frequency. The assumption is that this has happened to someone locally.
2019-09-22 00:36:29147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGAt exactly 1900 local time the repeater did a voice identification that was proceeded by a data burst. This is not the first time and since it proceeded and not followed the station I.D. it would be EXTREMELY difficult for someone to accomplish this.2019-10-05 00:00:00
Resolution: From listening to the log audio reports, these data bursts are packet radio transmissions that someone is sending over the repeater input frequency of 147.66 MHz. No repeater superhuman tricks here, but the repeater is dutifully repeating that signal and that is what is being heard. There is a popular Yeasu handheld radio that makes it easy to flip from the APRS frequency to the primary listening frequency. The assumption is that this has happened to someone locally.
2019-09-22 00:11:58147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGAt exactly 1900 local time the repeater did a voice identification that was proceeded by a data burst. This is not the first time and since it proceeded and not followed the station I.D. it would be EXTREMELY difficult for someone to accomplish this.2019-10-05 00:00:00
Resolution: From listening to the log audio reports, these data bursts are packet radio transmissions that someone is sending over the repeater input frequency of 147.66 MHz. No repeater superhuman tricks here, but the repeater is dutifully repeating that signal and that is what is being heard. There is a popular Yeasu handheld radio that makes it easy to flip from the APRS frequency to the primary listening frequency. The assumption is that this has happened to someone locally.
2019-09-22 00:07:38147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGAt exactly 1900 local time the repeater did a voice identification that was proceeded by a data burst. This is not the first time and since it proceeded and not followed the station I.D. it would be EXTREMELY difficult for someone to accomplish this.2019-10-05 00:00:00
Resolution: From listening to the log audio reports, these data bursts are packet radio transmissions that someone is sending over the repeater input frequency of 147.66 MHz. No repeater superhuman tricks here, but the repeater is dutifully repeating that signal and that is what is being heard. There is a popular Yeasu handheld radio that makes it easy to flip from the APRS frequency to the primary listening frequency. The assumption is that this has happened to someone locally.
2019-05-28 14:07:18147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLG05/28/19 Starting around 0700 the repeater is injecting a growling sound to the point that it over powers the party transmitting or receiving. WA6DKD asked me to report this problem0000-00-00 00:00:00
Resolution: This is the issue that we know about. Thanks for the additional data! This helps us ensure we are trying to mitigate the right issue.
2019-04-15 18:10:14147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGThis morning at approximately 9:25 AM the repeater sent out the W5NOR voice identifier about 6 times within a minute. I tried to contact Mark via text to see if he was working on th repeater via remote but never received any response. 73 Lea0000-00-00 00:00:00
Resolution: Audio file downloaded and will investigate. Interesting...
2019-04-11 16:45:54147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGToday, April 11, 2019 at 11:15 hrs local time and continuing thereafter the repeater noise was so great that 50 watt stations could barely make it into the repeater but were not understood by the other party. This HAS to stop if we aren't going to address and fix this then lets pull it completely out of service and just use the 800 repeater. I NEVER thought those words would come out of me but after I bought a higher power unit to have on my base and have a good antenna and this is still happening I can understand why new people don't stay in the hobby. I have repeatedly asked what I can do to help and still nothing??????? I'm beginning to think that I am "locked out" on purpose?????0000-00-00 00:00:00
Resolution: This is a re-occurrence of the known issue on which Mark is currently working on a potential solution. I will mark this as resolved as we know which issue this is.
2018-12-11 21:03:55147.06-Analog-RepeaterW5HLGOn 12/11/18 @ 14:58 CST there was another data burst on the frequency. As we eiscussed this is not the first.0000-00-00 00:00:00
Resolution: Will pull the audio file and evaluate potential sources. I have pulled the audio file and this appears to be a legitimate transmission. Most likely someone accidentally sent a data packet to the repeater. Repeater acted normally.
2018-10-25 04:00:00147.06-Analog-Repeaterw5ifnRepeater was unavailable.
Resolution: No observations available. The APRS log was checked on APRS.fi and it appears that the power was up at the site during the reported period. Waiting on a specific date/time to continue the review.
2018-10-25 04:00:00443.70-Analog-Repeaterw5ifnRepeater was unavailable.
Resolution: No observations available. The APRS log was checked on APRS.fi and it appears that the power was up at the site during the reported period. Waiting on a specific date/time to continue review.
2018-10-21 04:00:00147.06-Analog-Repeatern5uwyMain receiver shut down, not operating.2018-10-22 12:30:00
Resolution: The controller misunderstood some DTMF tones during an over the air programming session and the main repeater was shut down. A site visit was required and the controller programming was updated to a known good condition.
2018-10-20 23:00:00147.06-Analog-Repeaterw5ifnA set of digital tones were heard on the repeater. Tuning off the repeater frequency made it more obvious to be digital tones.
Resolution: No observations heard. Waiting on a specific date/time to review.